Another day
Another day
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unmontoto:

Benedetti, te quiero.
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staceythinx:

ASTRONITO by Juan Manuel Yañez
staceythinx:

ASTRONITO by Juan Manuel Yañez
staceythinx:

ASTRONITO by Juan Manuel Yañez
staceythinx:

ASTRONITO by Juan Manuel Yañez
staceythinx:

ASTRONITO by Juan Manuel Yañez
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Cuando quieres tanto a alguien, es inevitable no sentir miedo a perderlo.
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thecyberwolf:

Baby Groot and Rocket
Created by Bobby Chiu & Kei Acedera (Imaginism)
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Find theses Artists on Deviant Art - Website
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staceythinx:

Photographer Henning Rogge captures how nature is healing from the scars left behind by the bombs of World War II.
About the project:

Henning Rogge’s photographs of landscapes at first appear as quiet, pastoral scenes of the German forest and countryside. Titled with their locations, they read as serene portraits of specific places whose import is unclear. As the viewer learns more information, however, the works’ meaning grows more complex. These are sites where World War II bombing has left its mark, once-decimated areas that now blend into their surroundings.
Rogge began photographing such craters after randomly encountering one in the forest. “I was amazed by its size and clear, circular shape,” he says. “After doing some research, I found out that many similar-looking holes still exist all over the country.” The artist scours the German landscape to find them, often consulting aerial photographs and relying on complex mapping techniques.
Little evidence exists of the violence that created such craters. They are often filled with water, like makeshift ponds, and overgrown with trees. Rogge’s photographs point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid landscapes. “The craters are special to me because they don’t come across as dramatic like other sites connected to war,” he says. “They are more abstract. This sense of disconnection reflects my own position toward this period of German history, which is almost unimaginable to me.”
staceythinx:

Photographer Henning Rogge captures how nature is healing from the scars left behind by the bombs of World War II.
About the project:

Henning Rogge’s photographs of landscapes at first appear as quiet, pastoral scenes of the German forest and countryside. Titled with their locations, they read as serene portraits of specific places whose import is unclear. As the viewer learns more information, however, the works’ meaning grows more complex. These are sites where World War II bombing has left its mark, once-decimated areas that now blend into their surroundings.
Rogge began photographing such craters after randomly encountering one in the forest. “I was amazed by its size and clear, circular shape,” he says. “After doing some research, I found out that many similar-looking holes still exist all over the country.” The artist scours the German landscape to find them, often consulting aerial photographs and relying on complex mapping techniques.
Little evidence exists of the violence that created such craters. They are often filled with water, like makeshift ponds, and overgrown with trees. Rogge’s photographs point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid landscapes. “The craters are special to me because they don’t come across as dramatic like other sites connected to war,” he says. “They are more abstract. This sense of disconnection reflects my own position toward this period of German history, which is almost unimaginable to me.”
staceythinx:

Photographer Henning Rogge captures how nature is healing from the scars left behind by the bombs of World War II.
About the project:

Henning Rogge’s photographs of landscapes at first appear as quiet, pastoral scenes of the German forest and countryside. Titled with their locations, they read as serene portraits of specific places whose import is unclear. As the viewer learns more information, however, the works’ meaning grows more complex. These are sites where World War II bombing has left its mark, once-decimated areas that now blend into their surroundings.
Rogge began photographing such craters after randomly encountering one in the forest. “I was amazed by its size and clear, circular shape,” he says. “After doing some research, I found out that many similar-looking holes still exist all over the country.” The artist scours the German landscape to find them, often consulting aerial photographs and relying on complex mapping techniques.
Little evidence exists of the violence that created such craters. They are often filled with water, like makeshift ponds, and overgrown with trees. Rogge’s photographs point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid landscapes. “The craters are special to me because they don’t come across as dramatic like other sites connected to war,” he says. “They are more abstract. This sense of disconnection reflects my own position toward this period of German history, which is almost unimaginable to me.”
staceythinx:

Photographer Henning Rogge captures how nature is healing from the scars left behind by the bombs of World War II.
About the project:

Henning Rogge’s photographs of landscapes at first appear as quiet, pastoral scenes of the German forest and countryside. Titled with their locations, they read as serene portraits of specific places whose import is unclear. As the viewer learns more information, however, the works’ meaning grows more complex. These are sites where World War II bombing has left its mark, once-decimated areas that now blend into their surroundings.
Rogge began photographing such craters after randomly encountering one in the forest. “I was amazed by its size and clear, circular shape,” he says. “After doing some research, I found out that many similar-looking holes still exist all over the country.” The artist scours the German landscape to find them, often consulting aerial photographs and relying on complex mapping techniques.
Little evidence exists of the violence that created such craters. They are often filled with water, like makeshift ponds, and overgrown with trees. Rogge’s photographs point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid landscapes. “The craters are special to me because they don’t come across as dramatic like other sites connected to war,” he says. “They are more abstract. This sense of disconnection reflects my own position toward this period of German history, which is almost unimaginable to me.”
staceythinx:

Photographer Henning Rogge captures how nature is healing from the scars left behind by the bombs of World War II.
About the project:

Henning Rogge’s photographs of landscapes at first appear as quiet, pastoral scenes of the German forest and countryside. Titled with their locations, they read as serene portraits of specific places whose import is unclear. As the viewer learns more information, however, the works’ meaning grows more complex. These are sites where World War II bombing has left its mark, once-decimated areas that now blend into their surroundings.
Rogge began photographing such craters after randomly encountering one in the forest. “I was amazed by its size and clear, circular shape,” he says. “After doing some research, I found out that many similar-looking holes still exist all over the country.” The artist scours the German landscape to find them, often consulting aerial photographs and relying on complex mapping techniques.
Little evidence exists of the violence that created such craters. They are often filled with water, like makeshift ponds, and overgrown with trees. Rogge’s photographs point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid landscapes. “The craters are special to me because they don’t come across as dramatic like other sites connected to war,” he says. “They are more abstract. This sense of disconnection reflects my own position toward this period of German history, which is almost unimaginable to me.”
staceythinx:

Photographer Henning Rogge captures how nature is healing from the scars left behind by the bombs of World War II.
About the project:

Henning Rogge’s photographs of landscapes at first appear as quiet, pastoral scenes of the German forest and countryside. Titled with their locations, they read as serene portraits of specific places whose import is unclear. As the viewer learns more information, however, the works’ meaning grows more complex. These are sites where World War II bombing has left its mark, once-decimated areas that now blend into their surroundings.
Rogge began photographing such craters after randomly encountering one in the forest. “I was amazed by its size and clear, circular shape,” he says. “After doing some research, I found out that many similar-looking holes still exist all over the country.” The artist scours the German landscape to find them, often consulting aerial photographs and relying on complex mapping techniques.
Little evidence exists of the violence that created such craters. They are often filled with water, like makeshift ponds, and overgrown with trees. Rogge’s photographs point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid landscapes. “The craters are special to me because they don’t come across as dramatic like other sites connected to war,” he says. “They are more abstract. This sense of disconnection reflects my own position toward this period of German history, which is almost unimaginable to me.”
staceythinx:

Photographer Henning Rogge captures how nature is healing from the scars left behind by the bombs of World War II.
About the project:

Henning Rogge’s photographs of landscapes at first appear as quiet, pastoral scenes of the German forest and countryside. Titled with their locations, they read as serene portraits of specific places whose import is unclear. As the viewer learns more information, however, the works’ meaning grows more complex. These are sites where World War II bombing has left its mark, once-decimated areas that now blend into their surroundings.
Rogge began photographing such craters after randomly encountering one in the forest. “I was amazed by its size and clear, circular shape,” he says. “After doing some research, I found out that many similar-looking holes still exist all over the country.” The artist scours the German landscape to find them, often consulting aerial photographs and relying on complex mapping techniques.
Little evidence exists of the violence that created such craters. They are often filled with water, like makeshift ponds, and overgrown with trees. Rogge’s photographs point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid landscapes. “The craters are special to me because they don’t come across as dramatic like other sites connected to war,” he says. “They are more abstract. This sense of disconnection reflects my own position toward this period of German history, which is almost unimaginable to me.”
staceythinx:

Photographer Henning Rogge captures how nature is healing from the scars left behind by the bombs of World War II.
About the project:

Henning Rogge’s photographs of landscapes at first appear as quiet, pastoral scenes of the German forest and countryside. Titled with their locations, they read as serene portraits of specific places whose import is unclear. As the viewer learns more information, however, the works’ meaning grows more complex. These are sites where World War II bombing has left its mark, once-decimated areas that now blend into their surroundings.
Rogge began photographing such craters after randomly encountering one in the forest. “I was amazed by its size and clear, circular shape,” he says. “After doing some research, I found out that many similar-looking holes still exist all over the country.” The artist scours the German landscape to find them, often consulting aerial photographs and relying on complex mapping techniques.
Little evidence exists of the violence that created such craters. They are often filled with water, like makeshift ponds, and overgrown with trees. Rogge’s photographs point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid landscapes. “The craters are special to me because they don’t come across as dramatic like other sites connected to war,” he says. “They are more abstract. This sense of disconnection reflects my own position toward this period of German history, which is almost unimaginable to me.”
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gaussmultimedia:

MDG 2013-14. Postal con motivo “Deseo”, de Patricia Requena.
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cinemagorgeous:

Photography by Kylli Sparre.
cinemagorgeous:

Photography by Kylli Sparre.
cinemagorgeous:

Photography by Kylli Sparre.
cinemagorgeous:

Photography by Kylli Sparre.
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sosuperawesome:

Custom made leaves and flowers made with your photographs for framing, putting in a vase or to wear as a brooch or necklace. 

By Miranda van Dijk in Oud Beierland, The Netherlands.
sosuperawesome:

Custom made leaves and flowers made with your photographs for framing, putting in a vase or to wear as a brooch or necklace. 

By Miranda van Dijk in Oud Beierland, The Netherlands.
sosuperawesome:

Custom made leaves and flowers made with your photographs for framing, putting in a vase or to wear as a brooch or necklace. 

By Miranda van Dijk in Oud Beierland, The Netherlands.
sosuperawesome:

Custom made leaves and flowers made with your photographs for framing, putting in a vase or to wear as a brooch or necklace. 

By Miranda van Dijk in Oud Beierland, The Netherlands.
sosuperawesome:

Custom made leaves and flowers made with your photographs for framing, putting in a vase or to wear as a brooch or necklace. 

By Miranda van Dijk in Oud Beierland, The Netherlands.
sosuperawesome:

Custom made leaves and flowers made with your photographs for framing, putting in a vase or to wear as a brooch or necklace. 

By Miranda van Dijk in Oud Beierland, The Netherlands.
sosuperawesome:

Custom made leaves and flowers made with your photographs for framing, putting in a vase or to wear as a brooch or necklace. 

By Miranda van Dijk in Oud Beierland, The Netherlands.
sosuperawesome:

Custom made leaves and flowers made with your photographs for framing, putting in a vase or to wear as a brooch or necklace. 

By Miranda van Dijk in Oud Beierland, The Netherlands.
sosuperawesome:

Custom made leaves and flowers made with your photographs for framing, putting in a vase or to wear as a brooch or necklace. 

By Miranda van Dijk in Oud Beierland, The Netherlands.
sosuperawesome:

Custom made leaves and flowers made with your photographs for framing, putting in a vase or to wear as a brooch or necklace. 

By Miranda van Dijk in Oud Beierland, The Netherlands.
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"Lo que mucha gente llama amar consiste en elegir una mujer y casarse con ella. La eligen, te lo juro, los he visto. Como si se pudiera elegir en el amor, como si no fuera un rayo que te parte los huesos y te deja estancado en la mitad del patio. Vos dirás que -la eligen porque la aman-, yo creo que es al revés. A Beatriz no se la elige, a Julieta no se la elige. Vos no elegís la lluvia que te va a calar hasta los huesos cuando salís de un concierto."
Julio Cortázar 
(via subverpz)